January/February 2015

Departments and More

  • 4
    Editorial

    Send in the Clones

    Don’t get me wrong. I have nothing against communists, per se. Some of my best friends were communists.

  • 7
    Note Book

    The End of Pragmatism

    As the economy's crisis deepens, President Putin is increasingly focusing on intangibles.

  • 8
    Note Book

    Snapshot

    Stats and graphs on everything from Russians leaving the country, to Google search trends.

  • 9
    Note Book

    Note Book

    All the news that fit.

  • 16

    Travel Notes

    Everything of note on the travel front.

    News
  • 18

    Culture Wars

    Moscow is purging theaters, clubs and a media outlet that was at the forefront of covering protest actions.

    Social Issues
  • 19

    Terror's Legacy

    In December 1564, Ivan the Terrible abdicated the Russian throne. The consequences were dire and continue to affect Russian society, 450 years on.

    History
  • 21
    Russian Calendar

    Serov and 1905

    Born in 1865, Valentin Serov was one of Russia's greatest painters of the 19th and 20th centuries. His painting, 110 years ago, of Bloody Sunday, captured the tragedy and carnage of that pivotal event.

  • 23
    Russian Calendar

    1715: Peter and the Kunstkamera

    The year 1715 began with several innovations introduced by Tsar Peter I.

  • 22

    A Deluge of Images and Feelings

    Boris Pasternak was born 125 years ago. We look back at how he has been remembered.

    Literature
  • 23
    Russian Calendar

    First Book

    For centuries, the Russian Church strove to shield Muscovy from foreign influences, believing that they would weaken faith and put the kingdom in peril.

  • 24
    Russian Calendar

    Pushkin and Derzhavin

    On January 8, 1815 was the monumental "meeting" of Alexander Pushkin and Gavrila Derzhavin, the greatest poets of their respective generations.

    History Literature
  • 26
    Survival Russian

    The Long and Short of It

    Some well know short idioms actually have longer context that helps illuminate their deeper meanings.

  • 27
    Language Learning

    Boris Pasternak

    This issue's Uchites Russian language learning section includes an excerpt from Doctor Zhivago and a poem by Boris Pasternak.

  • 28

    Red Square

    Originally known as “Pozhar,” then “Torg,” Red Square is a repository of Russian historical memory, the altar of the motherland and, in general, the center of the Russian universe. But how did it all come together?

    History
  • 38

    Birthing Pains

    Birth was no easy thing in rural Russia in the nineteenth century, not for mother or child. All manner of bizarre and unsafe practices reigned, from being “corrected,” to getting popped in the oven, to being left alone all day while mom worked in the fields.

    History
  • 46
    Photo Feature

    Crimean Sojourn

    Mikhail Mordasov has been traveling all over Crimea since the annexation last spring. He shares this moving photo feature.

  • 52

    Soviet Redux

    It seems the more removed in time the USSR becomes, the more nostalgia grows for its symbols and traditions. Increasingly, these elements are worming their way back into Russian life. If they ever left.

    Social Issues
  • 60
    Cuisine

    May the Borshch Be With You!

    The new year is a perfect time to try borshch, which has an interesting history.

  • 62
    Under Review

    Two Megalomaniacs

    A review of two books on megalomaniacal personalities, The Baron's Cloak, by Willard Sunderland, and Limonov by Emmanuel Carrere. See our reviews section for full reviews.

  • 64
    Post Script

    Simple and Primitive

    Why the teachings of Marx and Lenin just won't go away, and why Russia's current ruling generation is the most Soviet of all time.

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

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