December 27, 2021

Nice Teeth, Gift Horse


Nice Teeth, Gift Horse
Who says Russians don't have any holiday spirit? The Russian Life files

A recent survey conducted by Russian Standard Bank uncovered some surprising trends and desires among their customers.

Most notably, only 20% of participants said they'd be happy with a monetary or gift card gift, down from 45.5% last year.

48% said they'd rather get exactly what they request from their family and loved ones, which is perhaps a little boring but certainly efficient. By way of comparison, 31% love surprises, presumably as long as the surprises are good surprises.

The survey is conducted yearly among Standard Bank clients, and in 2021 more than 1,000 responses were recorded.

This information, we suppose, is especially useful if you're being forced to participate in office Secret Ded Moroz this year.

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