January 06, 2021

Party Like It's Belarus


Party Like It's Belarus
If he doesn't get home by midnight, his mustache changes back into a little gray mouse. Office of the President of Belarus: president.gov.by

In the midst of a chaotic 2020, everyone's favorite eastern European mustachioed autocrat has been a paragon of poise.

From being banned from Lithuania to fleeing protests on a helicopter with his son clad in body armor to denying the coronavirus in his neighbors and ravaging his own country (declaring at a mask-free hockey match, "Do you see any coronavirus here?... It's better to die standing than live on your knees!"), it's been a big year for Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko.

So it's only fitting that he'd see in 2021 appropriately.

This New Years' holiday, Lukashenko was filmed attending a youth ball in Minsk, held December 29 at the Palace of Independence.

In attendance were 314 young men and women from throughout Belarus, along with most major ministers of the country. Of course, there's not a mask or any semblance of social distancing to be seen, although the ballroom dancing appears fairly impressive.

Oh, and his wish for 2021? That "the people would say thank you someday."

We assume that, alongside this wish, Lukashenko is also looking forward to some time at the dacha.

 

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