January 25, 2021

The Kingdom of Eternal Permafrost


The Kingdom of Eternal Permafrost

With abnormally cold weather in the Siberian city of Yakutsk, television news channels across Russia are advertising two lovely features of the subpolar city: the annual ice sculpture competition and the perpetual Kingdom of Permafrost.

This year's ice and snow contest was called Diamonds of Yakutiya and featured 60 works of water. It was dedicated to the 75th anniversary of Russia's victory in World War II, with many of the waterworks featuring military themes like tanks and life-size propaganda posters.

With the pandemic keeping international sculptors at bay, young local artists had a better chance to hone and show off their skills. The biggest prizes went to local Yakuts.

The Kingdom of Permafrost, a glacier and museum rolled into one, planted its flag in Yakutsk in 2005. The sovereign land remains frozen all year and includes an ice bar serving regional favorites like stroganina, frozen strips of raw fish that need to be eaten on ice before they spoil. Relax on the Iron – er, Ice – Throne from Game of Thrones and check out Grandfather Frost's house. Do not forget to bring your New Year's list. Also, try your hand at the inexplicably Olympic sport of curling.

Finally, take a ride down the ice slide, upon which you will earn a certificate with legal force confirming that you have been to the Kingdom of Permafrost.

Iron - er, Ice, Throne
A throne designed to make relaxation impossible. / Wikimedia Commons user JukoFF

 

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