June 29, 2022

Suing for Peace, and Compensation


Suing for Peace, and Compensation

"The looting of Ukrainian goods for export – including grain and steel – has already led to rising prices and an increase in the number of people dying of hunger worldwide. This barbarism must be stopped, and Russia must pay in full. I believe in justice, and I will fight for it.”

– Rinat Akhmetov, the Ukrainian businessman who is suing Russia

On June 27, Ukrainian businessman and owner of Azovstal steel plant Rinat Akhmetov filed a lawsuit against Russia in the European Court of Human rights. Akhmetov seeks compensation for his  personal businesses losses caused by the invasion, but also wider losses.

Akhmetov's industrial plant was brutally targeted; he is one of many businessmen whose assets have become targets. Akhmetov's mill is known for how it was bombarded with Russian shells, despite it sheltering many of Mariupol's residents. It was also the location for Ukrainian forces' last stand in the city

Akhmetov hopes to not only receive compensation for his own losses: he also wants Russia to rectify all damages it has wreaked throughout Ukraine, the violation of its property rights, and the global food crisis that has resulted.

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