May 11, 2022

The Fighters of Azov


The Fighters of Azov

“Surrender is not an option.”

–  Ilya Samoilenko, Ukrainian officer in the defense of Azov.

Since the start of the war on February 24, Russia has had its eye on the Ukrainian port city Mariupol. Housed within the city is the Azovstal steel mill. Many civilians have been hiding out in the mill, but now reports are that all civilians have been evacuated.

The last stand of Mariupol is taking place at Azovstal, and the mill has been turned into a fortress by Azov soldiers and Marines of the Ukrainian Armed Forces. Russians are bombing the plant daily. Samoilenko reports that there is still food, water, ammunition and weapons, but that they are unable to use artillery and they have not received any resupply. 

While Samoilenko is happy that over 1,000 civilians have been evacuated from Mariupol, he said he mourns the loss of the nearly 25,000 persons killed in the city since the start of the war.

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The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

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Stargorod is a mid-sized provincial city that exists only in Russian metaphorical space. It has its roots in Gogol, and Ilf and Petrov, and is a place far from Moscow, but close to Russian hearts. It is a place of mystery and normality, of provincial innocence and Black Earth wisdom. Strange, inexplicable things happen in Stargorod. So do good things. And bad things. A lot like life everywhere, one might say. Only with a heavy dose of vodka, longing and mystery.
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A beloved Russian classic about a resourceful Russian peasant, Vanya, and his miracle-working horse, who together undergo various trials, exploits and adventures at the whim of a laughable tsar, told in rich, narrative poetry.
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