May 09, 2022

Zelensky Returns


Zelensky Returns
Giving a pep talk. Press Office of the President of Ukraine.

On May 3, Ukrainian president Vladimir Zelensky addressed the Ukrainian parliament for the first time since the start of Russia's invasion of his country.

Zelensky's speech followed an address from British prime minister Boris Johnson, and Zelensky thanked Johnson for his support before calling for unity and action on the part of legislators to meet the threat from Russian forces.

Zelensky said he had not addressed Ukraine's Verkhovna Rada, the country's unicameral legislative body, since February because he had implicit confidence in the legislators. At the same time, he has been calling for financial and military support from legislatures around the world, including the US Congress, German Bundestag, and Israeli Knesset.

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