August 09, 2020

Criminal Camels


Criminal Camels
When one hump isn't enough. Alexandr Frolov, Wikimedia Commons

A plague is haunting a group of villages in a rural part of the steppe Astrakhan region. It's called camels.

A herd of some eighty two-humped Bactrian camels has been terrorizing towns and caused residents of the area to seek shelter indoors, not permitting their children to play outside. Besides trampling gardens, damaging utilities, and even defacing gravestones, the animals are reportedly very aggressive: "If you look one directly in the eye… the animal chases you, and you have to run away," said one villager.

The cause of the sudden ungulate uprising is an 83-year-old local retiree, who determined that he no longer had the time or resources to care for the animals, so he released them. As he has refused to take responsibility for the actions of his animals, he is effectively holding the towns hostage until he is paid for the camels. "I won't just give them away," he said.

The camel chaos has gotten so bad that it was even featured on the national news.

May we suggest transporting them by train?
 

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