February 02, 2022

Copperfield? I Hardly Know Her!


Copperfield? I Hardly Know Her!

“Usually, to put money on a card, you need an ATM; with magicians, everything is much simpler: just rub a coin and it becomes invisible.”

– Eugene, at Nevyansk prison in the Urals.

While it may not be often that we breathe the words "magic" and "prison" in the same sentence, Eugene has certainly found a way to put the magic in prison.

Even though Eugene is currently serving a stint for an unspecified violation, he has found comfort in magic that he learned back in his student days. The works of Harry Houdini and David Copperfield are his greatest inspirations. It isn't a real mystery as to why: Houdini was a master of escape and Copperfield was famous for his knack for flying onstage

Magic is currently just a hobby for Eugene, but once he is free he plans to fully indulge in his work and become a master illusionist, just like his heroes.

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