December 06, 2021

A Premature Celebration


A Premature Celebration
Money is so much better when obtained by legal means. The Russian Life files.

A Krasnodar man has been arrested for stealing 190,000 rubles ($2555) to celebrate his release from prison . . . where he was sent for committing robbery.

The 44-year-old man had recently been released from Penal Colony No. 29, and was looking to celebrate. Parties (and alcohol) can be expensive, so turning to crime apparently seemed like a nifty way to get some cash.

Finding a shift worker negotiating a taxi fare, the man took his suitcase, which contained the money. The victim reported the crime to the police, who were able to track the man via CCTV.

He faces five (more) years in prison. Hopefully he enjoyed his few days of freedom.

While the man might be a robber, he's certainly not a very good one.

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