August 18, 2021

Teach a Man to Phish


Teach a Man to Phish

“Don't believe it, don't click it, don't pay!”

– Sergey Volodkhin, director of the Russian company “Antiphishing”

Russian citizens are currently being tempted with a tantalizing online money raffling scheme. On August 16, Volodkhin explained the mechanics of the “new” scam that allegedly takes place on instant messengers that uses greed as psychological bait.

“This scheme of deception can hardly be called new, because all the characteristic elements are traced in it: the appeal of unprecedented generosity in the form of gift-giving, a small commission compared to the amount of the prize, and an additional condition for receiving money - entering the full payment data of the card.”

Volodkhin explains that there is a catch even for those who are skeptical of the prize. How many of us are immune to a little “what if” thinking?

After engaging with a message, a user is directed to a phishing site, where a prize for the “messenger promotion” is listed as one million dollars. The victim is allowed to choose any application to find out the size of the prize, which ranges from 10 to 5000 dollars. The next step is to a chat with the “administrator,” where he learns that he is one of 100 “happy” users who is eligible for several thousand dollars of additional prizes. The "bank operator" then warns that the transfer of currency between residents within the country is prohibited, and the winnings must be converted into rubles and the victim must pay a small commission of several hundred rubles. He is then asked for all sensitive information on his bank card, which can also be used to withdraw all money from the victim’s account.

Be careful – with the onslaught of coronavirus QR code requirements, you might be subjected to other, more subtle scams, too...

 

You Might Also Like

The Russian Art of the Con
  • July 01, 2002

The Russian Art of the Con

A look at the art of cheating in Russia today--what are the newest cons and who is falling prey to them?
Taxis, Guns, and Scams
  • December 31, 2020

Taxis, Guns, and Scams

This week, we mark the end of 2020 with transportation stats, social media monitoring, and preparations for wild celebrations.
Criminal QR-Codes
  • August 12, 2020

Criminal QR-Codes

Be careful what QR-codes you scan in Russia, you may be opening yourself up to fraud.
Like this post? Get a weekly email digest + member-only deals

Some of Our Books

Faith & Humor: Notes from Muscovy

Faith & Humor: Notes from Muscovy

A book that dares to explore the humanity of priests and pilgrims, saints and sinners, Faith & Humor has been both a runaway bestseller in Russia and the focus of heated controversy – as often happens when a thoughtful writer takes on sacred cows. The stories, aphorisms, anecdotes, dialogues and adventures in this volume comprise an encyclopedia of modern Russian Orthodoxy, and thereby of Russian life.
The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar (bilingual)

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar (bilingual)

The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
Fearful Majesty

Fearful Majesty

This acclaimed biography of one of Russia’s most important and tyrannical rulers is not only a rich, readable biography, it is also surprisingly timely, revealing how many of the issues Russia faces today have their roots in Ivan’s reign.
Moscow and Muscovites

Moscow and Muscovites

Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
93 Untranslatable Russian Words

93 Untranslatable Russian Words

Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.
Okudzhava Bilingual

Okudzhava Bilingual

Poems, songs and autobiographical sketches by Bulat Okudzhava, the king of the Russian bards. 
Steppe / Степь (bilingual)

Steppe / Степь (bilingual)

This is the work that made Chekhov, launching his career as a writer and playwright of national and international renown. Retranslated and updated, this new bilingual edition is a super way to improve your Russian.
The Little Humpbacked Horse (bilingual)

The Little Humpbacked Horse (bilingual)

A beloved Russian classic about a resourceful Russian peasant, Vanya, and his miracle-working horse, who together undergo various trials, exploits and adventures at the whim of a laughable tsar, told in rich, narrative poetry.

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

Latest Posts

Our Contacts

Russian Life
73 Main Street, Suite 402
Montpelier VT 05602

802-223-4955