August 19, 2022

Grounded for Life


Grounded for Life
Up, up and blown away. Wikimedia commons user Toshi Aoki - JP Spotters

On August 9, a Russian airbase located 110 miles behind the frontlines was attacked with artillery. While Ukraine is not taking personal responsibility for the attack, President Volodymyr Zelensky  suggested that partisans may be behind the assault.

The Russian military is currently denying any damage caused by the onslaught, but aerial photographs and Ukrainian intelligence suggest otherwise; the photographs reveal the charred remains of earth and aircraft, and reports state that as many as 11 aircraft were been put out of commission.

Even though the Ukrainian army denies having a hand in the assault, government officials are taking every opportunity to gloat about the victory; the day after the attack Zelensky noted how it has affected the enemy's numbers: “In just one day, the occupiers lost 10 combat aircraft: nine in Crimea and one more in the direction of Zaporizhzhia. The occupiers also suffer new losses of armored vehicles, warehouses with ammunition, logistics routes.”

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