August 19, 2022

Grounded for Life


Grounded for Life
Up, up and blown away. Wikimedia commons user Toshi Aoki - JP Spotters

On August 9, a Russian airbase located 110 miles behind the frontlines was attacked with artillery. While Ukraine is not taking personal responsibility for the attack, President Volodymyr Zelensky  suggested that partisans may be behind the assault.

The Russian military is currently denying any damage caused by the onslaught, but aerial photographs and Ukrainian intelligence suggest otherwise; the photographs reveal the charred remains of earth and aircraft, and reports state that as many as 11 aircraft were been put out of commission.

Even though the Ukrainian army denies having a hand in the assault, government officials are taking every opportunity to gloat about the victory; the day after the attack Zelensky noted how it has affected the enemy's numbers: “In just one day, the occupiers lost 10 combat aircraft: nine in Crimea and one more in the direction of Zaporizhzhia. The occupiers also suffer new losses of armored vehicles, warehouses with ammunition, logistics routes.”

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The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
Fearful Majesty

Fearful Majesty

This acclaimed biography of one of Russia’s most important and tyrannical rulers is not only a rich, readable biography, it is also surprisingly timely, revealing how many of the issues Russia faces today have their roots in Ivan’s reign.
Fish: A History of One Migration

Fish: A History of One Migration

This mesmerizing novel from one of Russia’s most important modern authors traces the life journey of a selfless Russian everywoman. In the wake of the Soviet breakup, inexorable forces drag Vera across the breadth of the Russian empire. Facing a relentless onslaught of human and social trials, she swims against the current of life, countering adversity and pain with compassion and hope, in many ways personifying Mother Russia’s torment and resilience amid the Soviet disintegration.
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A beloved Russian classic about a resourceful Russian peasant, Vanya, and his miracle-working horse, who together undergo various trials, exploits and adventures at the whim of a laughable tsar, told in rich, narrative poetry.
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