November 17, 2021

Belarus, Bigwigs, and Boasting


Belarus, Bigwigs, and Boasting

“I knew Hafez Assad, I knew Saddam Hussein, I knew Muammar Gaddafi. We had very good and close relationships with them. We met with them. I'll tell you, the greatest thinkers! ”

– President of Belarus Alexander Lukashenko

Alexander Lukashenko could apparently not pass up the opportunity to toot his own horn while in the hot seat this week. On November 10, he boasted of his relations with some of modern history’s "greatest" dictators when interviewing with the editor-in-chief of Russia's National Defense magazine Igor Korotchenko.

In the past few months, trouble has been brewing on the borders of Belarus and Poland, and the Belarusian President has found himself front and center as his regime has allegedly shuffled thousands of migrants from the Near and Middle East – at times allegedly providing them with wire cutters – to Poland’s borders.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has been drawn into the shenanigans, accused by Poland of attempting to begin conflict with the European Union through his Lukashenko proxy. Whether or not Putin has actually played a leading role in the brewing conflict, he decided to back Lukashenko, his close ally. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov suggested on November 9 that if the European Union were interested in stopping the migrant crisis, they could pay for it.

“….Why when refugees were coming from Turkey did the EU provide financing so that they stayed in the Turkish republic? Why is it not possible to help the Belarusians in the same way?"

All suggestions are appreciated when it comes to protecting human life, but if we’re going by Lukashenko’s comments, it seems like he already knows the right kind of folks to lend a hand.

 

 

 

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