February 16, 2022

A Priest's Life Hack for Marital Strife


A Priest's Life Hack for Marital Strife

If you had a fight with your wife, then you should ask for forgiveness like this: 'Darling, please forgive me for asking you to marry me….' There is a real chance that suddenly your wife will smile and forgive you. True, wives are unpredictable in their grievancesyou can die from violence.”

– A Russian priest from the village of Nakhabino.

Priest and blogger from St. George's church Pavel Ostrovsky has spoken new gospel on ending fights between married couples. His solution? If you proposed, just apologize for having done so. And if you were the one who said yes to the proposal, you can simply apologize for having agreed to marry them: "With penitence, you can say to the offended head of the family: 'Dear, I'm sorry that I agreed to your marriage proposal. I should have warned you that you don’t know what fiery pool you decided to jump into.'" 

Ostrovsky seems to have stumbled on a perfect way to end any marital dispute: having used it himself, he can attest to its usefulness. The only downside? He warns people that while it does work, you should avoid having to use it a second time.

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