June 15, 2021

You Had One Job



You Had One Job
Aren't you forgetting something?  Photo by D-Keller via Pixabay

The main goals of a robbery are to, as the saying goes, "take the money and run," but apparently the pressure of the job caused this group of criminals in Moscow to forget one of these principal tenets of burglary. 

Recently in Moscow, a group of three criminals was able to enter an apartment after luring the occupant outside and holding him against his will. While inside the apartment, they managed to gather more than a million rubles (approximately $14,000 USD). Cunningly, they shoved their ill-gotten goods into a backpack and placed it on the couch in the apartment.

The flaw in their plan was that they forgot their backpack (and its contents) on the couch when they fled the scene of the crime. In total, the victim only lost about R200,000 (approximately $2,780 USD) in damage and lost goods. So while the occupant still suffered what must have been a traumatic event, they were lucky that their assailants weren't such smooth criminals after all. 

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