January 12, 2022

Worth a Pretty Kitty


Worth a Pretty Kitty
There's more than one way to sell a cat. Avito

On January 5, the website for the Tula Press reported on an advertisement for a rather expensive, rather grumpy-looking black-and-white cat with green slitted eyes on Avito, the Russian equivalent of Craigslist. The feline was going for 6.5 million rubles (approximately $862,900 USD).

The draw? The cat was supposedly once held by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

What one wouldn’t do for some Putin swag! The advertiser was apparently also willing to trade his pet in exchange for a Mercedes-Benz E 200, a Kawasaki Ninja 600, or a house.

Although it seems as though the advertisement for the Oreo-colored beast has since gone down, there is a grey cat advertised as “Putin’s” on Avito by user Zahar Gribov, posted on January 3. This little furball is going for a slight uptick in price – one hundred billion rubles (approximately $1,327,555,000 USD).

Greyface is, however, advertised as a “bablkwaser,” a term that apparently originates with the video game “Brawl Stars” and refers to a gamer who is too young or inexperienced.

Could the salesperson be implying that anyone going in for this kind of a scam is a bit of a noob?

 

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