December 15, 2021

Barking Up the Right Tree


Barking Up the Right Tree

“There is a saying in Russian and English and other languages: 'When the dogs bark, but the caravan keeps walking.' One explanation is that nothing can hinder the progress of a caravan. The government sometimes derisively says the same about journalists. They bark, but it does not affect anything. But I was recently told that the saying has an opposite explanation. The caravan drives forward because the dogs bark. They growl and savage the predators in the mountains and the desert. The caravan can move forward only with the dogs around. Yes, we growl and bite. Yes, we have sharp teeth and strong grip. But we are the prerequisite for progress. We are the antidote against tyranny.”

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and editor-in-chief of Novaya Gazeta Dmitriy Muratov

On December 10, Dmitriy Muratov, the editor-in-chief of the Russian publication Novaya Gazeta and Nobel Laureate, emphasized the importance of journalism in today’s world during his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. He also reminded his audience that, in the words of Russian Soviet nuclear physicist and dissident Andrei Sakharov, "peace, progress, and human rights - these three goals are inextricably linked."

 

 

 

 

 

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