Uchites

Uchites is the Russian language learning supplement to Russian Life magazine. Begun with support from the Russkiy Mir Foundation, its intent is to tie language learning exercises and readings into material that is published in each issue of the magazine. As each issue is published, a PDF copy of the Uchites supplement will be posted here, so that teachers can easily print out extra copies for students. Or so students can mark up these copies of Uchites, rather than their copies of Russian Life.

If you have comments or feedback on the Uchites supplements (for example, how you are using them, corrections, etc.), please send us a comment and we will post them on this page, to share with other teachers.

Uchites 23
Uchites 23

The Romanovs ~ May/June 2013

Uchites 24
Uchites 24

Turgenev ~ Sep/Oct 2013

Uchites 24 - Audio
Uchites 24 - Audio

Turgenev, "First Love"

Uchites 25
Uchites 25

Children's Railroad ~ Nov/Dec 2013

Uchites 26
Uchites 26

Dmitry Mendeleyev ~ Jan/Feb 2014

Uchites 26 - Audio
Uchites 26 - Audio

Did Mendeleyev invent vodka?

Uchites 27
Uchites 27

Ivan Bunin ~ Mar/Apr 2014

Uchites 28
Uchites 28

Mikhail Glinka ~ May/June 2014

Uchites 29
Uchites 29

Simferopol Banksy ~ July/Aug 2014

Uchites 30
Uchites 30

Mikhail Lermontov ~ Sep/Oct 2014

Uchites 30 - Audio
Uchites 30 - Audio

Audio of Lermontov Poem

Uchites 31
Uchites 31

Boris Pasternak ~ Jan/Feb 2015

Uchites 32
Uchites 32

Yuri Nagibin ~ Mar/Apr 2015

Uchites 33
Uchites 33

May Holidays ~ May/June 2015

Uchites 34
Uchites 34

War and Peace ~ July/Aug 2015

Uchites 35
Uchites 35

Matching Proverbs ~ Nov/Dec 2015 

Uchites 36
Uchites 36

Pushkin's Magic Fish ~ Jan/Feb 2016 

Uchites 37
Uchites 37

Lost and Found in Translation ~ March/April 2016

Uchites 38
Uchites 38

Anton Chekhov: "In the Country" ~ May/June 2016

Uchites 39
Uchites 39

Samovar! ~ July/August 2016

 

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EVENTS FOR RUSSOPHILES

20th Annual Russian Arts and Culture Festival
May 01, 2021 to May 31, 2021

20th Annual Russian Arts and Culture Festival

Virtual | N/A, N/A

The City of West Hollywood administration invites everyone to join a virtual celebration of Russian Arts and Culture this May. An array of musical events, activities for kids, workshops, virtual tours, concerts, contests, interviews with interesting people, and much more will comprise a month-long celebration. The program of our events will be published on the website of the festival and in the Facebook group.

A Few of Our Books

Russia Rules

Russia Rules

From the shores of the White Sea to Moscow and the Northern Caucasus, Russian Rules is a high-speed thriller based on actual events, terrifying possibilities, and some really stupid decisions.
Fearful Majesty

Fearful Majesty

This acclaimed biography of one of Russia’s most important and tyrannical rulers is not only a rich, readable biography, it is also surprisingly timely, revealing how many of the issues Russia faces today have their roots in Ivan’s reign.
Marooned in Moscow

Marooned in Moscow

This gripping autobiography plays out against the backdrop of Russia's bloody Civil War, and was one of the first Western eyewitness accounts of life in post-revolutionary Russia. Marooned in Moscow provides a fascinating account of one woman's entry into war-torn Russia in early 1920, first-person impressions of many in the top Soviet leadership, and accounts of the author's increasingly dangerous work as a journalist and spy, to say nothing of her work on behalf of prisoners, her two arrests, and her eventual ten-month-long imprisonment, including in the infamous Lubyanka prison. It is a veritable encyclopedia of life in Russia in the early 1920s.
Bears in the Caviar

Bears in the Caviar

Bears in the Caviar is a hilarious and insightful memoir by a diplomat who was “present at the creation” of US-Soviet relations. Charles Thayer headed off to Russia in 1933, calculating that if he could just learn Russian and be on the spot when the US and USSR established relations, he could make himself indispensable and start a career in the foreign service. Remarkably, he pulled it of.
Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

In this comprehensive, quixotic and addictive book, Edwin Trommelen explores all facets of the Russian obsession with vodka. Peering chiefly through the lenses of history and literature, Trommelen offers up an appropriately complex, rich and bittersweet portrait, based on great respect for Russian culture.
The Samovar Murders

The Samovar Murders

The murder of a poet is always more than a murder. When a famous writer is brutally stabbed on the campus of Moscow’s Lumumba University, the son of a recently deposed African president confesses, and the case assumes political implications that no one wants any part of.
The Little Humpbacked Horse

The Little Humpbacked Horse

A beloved Russian classic about a resourceful Russian peasant, Vanya, and his miracle-working horse, who together undergo various trials, exploits and adventures at the whim of a laughable tsar, told in rich, narrative poetry.
At the Circus

At the Circus

This wonderful novella by Alexander Kuprin tells the story of the wrestler Arbuzov and his battle against a renowned American wrestler. Rich in detail and characterization, At the Circus brims with excitement and life. You can smell the sawdust in the big top, see the vivid and colorful characters, sense the tension build as Arbuzov readies to face off against the American.
Survival Russian

Survival Russian

Survival Russian is an intensely practical guide to conversational, colloquial and culture-rich Russian. It uses humor, current events and thematically-driven essays to deepen readers’ understanding of Russian language and culture. This enlarged Second Edition of Survival Russian includes over 90 essays and illuminates over 2000 invaluable Russian phrases and words.

Popular Articles

Peace, Land, Bread
April 23, 2014

Peace, Land, Bread

By Eugenia Sokolskaya

Peace! Land! Bread! This was the battle cry of the 1917 October Revolution (old calendar) that changed the history of Russia and indeed the entire world. Since the time of Ivan the Terrible, the tsars concentrated on centralization of their power and control. The most common way of doing this was to take power away from the nobility, appeasing them by giving them dominion over their land and workers. This soon developed into the oppressive, slave-style condition known as serfdom.

Why Don't Russians Smile?
January 10, 2014

Why Don't Russians Smile?

By The Editors

It is a common trope that Russians never smile. Which of course is interpreted to mean they are unfriendly, gloomy, sullen – positively Dostoyevskian. This, of course, is a complete misreading of body language and cultural norms.

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

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