November 15, 2022

The Booze Must Flow


The Booze Must Flow
Don't let the sand worms get any. The Russian Life files

Russia's Ministry of Industry and Trade announced recently that citizens will be able to purchase foreign alcohol products through a parallel importation system.

The news comes as Russia has become a closed market for many, with foreign companies leaving in droves following Putin's invasion of Ukraine. As a result, Russian consumers have been unable to access foreign favorites.

However, through the new parallel importation scheme, which will bring in drinks from overseas through alternative and semi-lawful channels, Russians will be able to once again enjoy the likes of Jack Daniels, Jose Cuervo, and Malibu. The Ministry assures consumers that there should be no issues with supply, even in rural areas.

While Russian citizens continue to suffer from the effects of international sanctions and global isolation, it's good to see that at least the Ministry has its priorities straight.

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