April 27, 2021

Squirrelly Behavior in Barnaul


Squirrelly Behavior in Barnaul
Let's just hope they don't start releasing moose into the park next (Sorry, Bullwinkle).  Andre Svistunov, unsplash.com

Five squirrels were released from the Barnaul Zoo into a city park this past week as part of an initiative to repopulate wildlife into the urban environment. The fluffy critters were thrilled to explore their new habitat, but perhaps one got a little too carried away. 

It's impossible to say whether this was a personal vendetta (perhaps the journalist was the infamous Boris Badenov?) or if the squirrel just thought that they would be an intriguing obstacle to climb all over; nevertheless, a reporter's iPhone and notepad were taken down in the altercation, as you can see in this hilarious video. Thankfully, both parties were unharmed, and the squirrel scurried off to live a life free of crime. 

Interestingly enough, while most American parks are chock full of squirrels (stocked there in the nineteenth century, so it turns out), this is not always the case in some Russian cities. Prior to this event, there were actually no squirrels in this particular park in Barnaul. 

To help make the new park residents feel more at home, authorities built them specially-designed squirrel houses and feeding platforms, which came stocked with squirrel-friendly dried fruit and nuts. 

It's worth noting that this isn't the first time in recent events that an animal has come after a Russian reporter either. We sense a conspiracy...

 

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