January 20, 2021

Like Uber for Booze


Like Uber for Booze
For when you need vodka, now. We've all been there. Viktor Mogilat

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, one thing has continued: alcohol production and sale. And thanks to an initiative recently supported by the Ministry of Industry and Trade, Russians may soon be able to buy their alcohol without leaving their homes.

A legal proposal put forth by a St. Petersburg official would allow for the distance purchasing of alcohol, such as via phone or online. The recent endorsement by the Ministry is a step in the right direction for those of us that want beer, but don't really want to get off the couch just yet.

This is likely a change spurred by the pandemic, as everything in life moves online to prevent the spread of COVID-19. While some were hopeful that this change would have been implemented before the New Year holiday, the gears of government move slowly, even when dealing with alcohol. After all, there's a lot that goes into making a black-market activity legal. Oh, well. There's always 2022.

We're just hoping it doesn't force the little guys out of business.

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