October 08, 2021

Dressed to Kill Their Careers


Dressed to Kill Their Careers
Bad socks, sad ties, oh my! Livi Po and Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

Two prosecutors of Russia’s Krasnoyarsk Territory were denied a cash bonus for the third quarter of the year because their choices of accessory apparently knocked the socks off the region’s Chief Prosecutor.

On October 1, Telegram channel Baza published a complaint against the two officials. Maksim Cherkashin, an assistant prosecutor, had the gall to wear white socks to a work meeting, and senior prosecutor Anatoly Andreev schlepped to court in a self-tying tie and low shoes that were not standard for the prosecutor’s uniform.

The text noted that "the wearing of a uniform by a prosecutor's office employee should be associated with a sense of pride in belonging to the prosecutor's system," and that the employees did not adhere to the "business dress code corresponding to the status of a civil servant."

Roman Tyutyunik, the region’s Chief Prosecutor, said that the two had ignored their official duties when they violated uniform requirements.

Knotty Andreev, can’t tie your own! And what can we say, Cherkashin, everybody knows that white socks only pair well with sandals. Though we suppose things could be worse – at least no one showed up in a cat mask.

 

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