May 17, 2022

Detained on Victory Day


Detained on Victory Day
Victory Parade in Moscow, 2020.  Wikimedia Commons, Press Office of the President of Russia.

It is estimated that over 125 demonstrators were arrested for anti-war actions during the annual Immortal Regiment procession. While two demonstrators made headlines, many more are facing prosecution.

Artem Potapov spent the day sitting on a bench in Pushkinskaya Square, Moscow, giving out candy to individuals against the war. Next to him on the bench sat a sign stating in Russian “кто против войны угощайтесь конфетой,”which translates to “Those against war, help yourself to candy.” Potapov remains in detainment.

The second individual, Ekaterina Voronina, was detained in Korolev. Voronina was detained for carrying a relative’s portrait with the message, “Он не хотел повторить,” which translates to “He didn’t want it to happen again.” The photo also had more quotations that supported peace, not war.

It is unclear what the individuals are being charged with.

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