April 08, 2023

Defector Reveals Kremlin Paranoia


Defector Reveals Kremlin Paranoia

Gleb Karaulov, an engineer in the Federal Security Service (FSO), which is responsible for the immediate security and operations of the Russian presidency, defected late last year with his family, during an overseas trip to Turkey. The picture he paints of President Vladimir Putin's isolation and paranoia is chilling: "He protects himself from the entire world with all sorts of barriers, the same quarantine, the lack of information. His perception of reality is very distorted.”

Karaulov told his story in an interview with The Dossier Center, which is in the video embedded here, and is summarized in an article with Meduza, which can be read in English via Google Translate here.

Tags: KremlinPutin
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