February 17, 2022

Cute Cats, a Lost Dog, and Insect Exes


Cute Cats, a Lost Dog, and Insect Exes
In Odder News

In this week's Odder News: a troublesome impersonation, digging for a dog, and a street sled.

  • Who has the time to look for cute cat pictures these days? Fortunately, you don't have to! For the small fee of R500 ($6.50) per month, an entrepreneur from Kemerovo will send you your daily dose of cute kitties, no questions asked, if that’s something you really need.
  • Several zoos across Russia took a less-than-loving (albeit profitable) approach to celebrating Valentine's Day. Zoo-goers were able to pay a small fee to have cockroaches named after their exes before the park animals chowed down on the insects. Seems like a mature way to cope.
  • As shocking as it may seem, police officers don't always have the best sense of humor. They especially dislike impersonators, and now one unlucky Russian blogger is facing fines for acting like a rooster while wearing a police uniform on camera.
  • The Olympics are still a big deal in Russia, even if their athletes are not allowed to compete under the Russian flag. To show their support for the Russian bobsled team, some fans in Yekaterinburg rode around the city in an improvised sled made out of a bathtub towed behind a car. I wonder where they got their inspiration?
  • Some pet owners will stop at nothing to help their furry family members. One such Russian hunter dug for five days straight to save his dog, which had gotten stuck in a badger burrow. The man and several of his friends dug 10 huge holes before they finally found the Jagdterrier, who has since made a full recovery.

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