August 23, 2021

Biscuithead Sweet-Talks on Safety


Biscuithead Sweet-Talks on Safety
The bread offender Screenshots from TolkoNovosti

Administrators of the Ministry of Emergency Situations in Tula Oblast have decided to approach their educational efforts with sugar and spice. On August 13, the Tulksy television channel reported that rather than simply lecturing local youth on safety measures, they would make use of the charms of one of the region’s favorite teatime treats.

The Ministry fashioned a new safety mascot with the sickly-sweet head of a “Tulsky Pryanik,” one of the region’s culinary specialties (and rather similar to the Gorodets pryaniki we wrote about in our July/August issue). The gingerbread biscuits, which come stamped with sometimes hand-crafted designs and usually the name of the region in script, are popular gifts from those who have visited Tula.

but tulsky pryanik biscuit
Tulsky Gift! | Photograph by Piv-pro on Russian Wikipedia

The Ministry of Emergency Situations’ decorated pryanik, who carries a stuffed fire extinguisher, will be providing interactive demonstrations alongside humanoid colleagues to help the region’s youth better remember safety rules. Pryanik Head’s first assignment at the “New Wave” recreation center included demonstrations of fire safety equipment and lessons on how children should conduct themselves when a blaze breaks out.

There is a Russian expression equivalent to the “stick and carrot” – “knut i pryanik,” or “whip and pryanik.” We'll just let you sit with that one.

 

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