March 27, 2023

All's Not Fair in Advertisement


All's Not Fair in Advertisement
A Ukrainian war-themed advertisement. Anatoli Stefan Shtirlitz, Telegram.

Ukraine's legislative body, the Rada, is considering banning war-themed products after companies began naming foods and drinks after wartime events and massacres. 

Products like "The Heroic Bucha Kombucha with citric flavor," "Azovstal" radishes, and "Heroes Don't Die" beer triggered a public outcry, with social media users comparing the practice to naming products after Nazi concentration camps. Deputies of the Rada condemned the decision to name goods after the massacres in Bucha and Mariupol, deeming it exploitative.

Ukrainian blogger and soldier Anatoly Shtefan posted pictures on Telegram of war-themed products, including a pita bread packaging with soldiers and a vodka brand with the slogan "Created in Ukraine during the resistance," among others. In one of his posts that included a picture of bread loaves characterized as soldiers, he wrote: "The disease of marketers is progressing."

The newly introduced law would ban the registration of brand names that evoke military events, cities, or places that suffered or resisted Russian aggression (unless registered before the war), hostilities and military operations, weapons, military units, and official greetings to the Ukrainian Armed Forces. A similar ban will also be drafted for advertisements. However, the laws won't affect the promotion of videos, films, or books about the war.

 

 

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