March 16, 2023

A Victory for Navalny


A Victory for Navalny
Yulia Navalnaya giving her speech at the 95th Academy Awards after Navalny victory. Screenshot of "NAVALNY Accepts the Oscar for Documentary Feature Film," Youtube.

Navalny, a documentary film that delves into the Russian government's plans to assassinate the anti-corruption campaigner and ex-presidential candidate, won the Oscar for best documentary feature.

In the film, Canadian director Daniel Roher presents the captivating story of Alexei Navalny's political ascent, and his remarkable survival of a poisoning attempt and subsequent incarceration in Russian prison. The Kremlin critic's condition is currently unknown, as he hasn't been able to see his family in over six months. His attorneys are only able to visit him through a "guarded veil."

The Oscars ceremony was made even more poignant by the attendance of Yulia Navalnaya, Navalny's wife, and their children Daria and Zakhar. They joined the film's team and investigators – including Christo Grozev from Bellingcat and Maria Pevchikh – on stage. With poise, Navalnaya addressed her husband in her speech, "I am dreaming of the day when you will be free and our country will be free. Stay strong, my love."

Navalny's win marks an important moment in recognizing the power of documentary films to tell critical stories and create public awareness about global issues.

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