April 07, 2016

A kick in the face of public taste


A kick in the face of public taste

Get a kick out of life

1. The Panama Papers exposed massive corruption among the cream of the world's political crop. Among other Russian bigwigs, renowned cellist Sergei Roldugin may have to face the music for orchestrating offshore tax evasion. President Vladimir Putin’s name, however, is a glaring absence from all 11.5 million leaked documents. Read Russian Life’s cheat sheet on what the Panama Papers mean for Russia.

2. A Russian wrestler wins at worst selfie stunt by urinating on a statue of Buddha and aiming a karate kick at the deity’s face. He may face jail time for hooliganism motivated by religious hatred (same charge as Pussy Riot, for the curious). Not to mention angry locals who swarmed his hotel to demand an apology. Buddha may be forgiving, but not all Buddhists are so ready to forgive.

3. Are they doing downward-facing dog or planting a bomb? Police in Moscow and St. Petersburg weren’t so sure about the difference when they arrested about 30 people suspected of being members of the Japanese doomsday cult Aum Shinrikyo. As it turned out, the detainees just shared a passion for yoga.

In Odder News

  • What’s worse: sledgehammering through a wall to steal candy bars, or feeling ashamed of your sweet tooth and lying that you stole beer?
  • The latest in patriotic dining: Krasnoyarsk’s new President Café boasts a life-sized cartoon Putin, photos of Vova's youth, and of course, Obama toilet paper.
  • In the most adorable rescue mission ever, firefighters saved 50 rabbits from a burning penal colony. Don’t worry about the inmates, either: every bunny made it out safe.

Quote of the Week

"Buddha would certainly have forgiven him for this, because according to our religion, if you do not accept evil, it has no bearing on you…But in terms of the geopolitical region, guests need to be put in their place…If not for the police, the mob would have killed this guy."

—Mandzhiev Bator, a resident of Elista, the capital of the largely Buddhist region of Kalmykia, on wrestler Said Osmanov’s alleged desecration of a Buddhist temple and the locals’ angry response.

Image credit: gazeta.ru

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