May 20, 2020

A Historic Drinking Development


A Historic Drinking Development
Kofe s limonom just doesn't have the same ring, or taste. RussianLife files

A major shift in Russian palates has occurred right under our noses: for the first time since, well, ever, Russians are now drinking more coffee than tea.

Russia, long considered a "tea country" (and sporting the samovar as a national symbol) saw its most ubiquitous drink overtaken last year, when coffee consumption eclipsed tea consumption. According to the trade organization RusTeaCoffee, in 2019, Russians drank 140,000 tons of tea products, falling short of the 180,000 tons of coffee products.

This follows a long-lasting trend that has seen coffee consumption nearly double over the last ten years. Experts estimate that the taste for coffee will remain at this level for the foreseeable future.

At least neither coffee nor tea can be bootlegged.

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