April 15, 2020

Why So Mean?



Why So Mean?
Photo by Sunyu Kim on Unsplash

“You know, it got to the point that they give such nasty information on [channel] Rossiya 1. Ah, the old man treats his people there with a tractor, vodka, a bath ... You know, I used to joke on the fly. But every joke has a certain degree of a joke... Russians would like to say to those who are ‘dancing’ [chatting]: don’t touch us! We haven’t asked for anything from them. We save ourselves, defend ourselves. Come visit us, see for yourself. But why are you making fools of us in Russia? Why should a Russian person get it into their head that there, in the West, our Belarusans, they’re some kind of crazy?"

- President of Belarus Alexander Lukashenko on bias in Russian media against Belarusans

Tags: belarus

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