May 20, 2020

What Will Russians Want Next on TV?



What Will Russians Want Next on TV?
Photo by Sunyu Kim on Unsplash

“I think that, first of all, viewers will want to watch something easy. Comedy, melodramas about love, and, of course, blockbusters, but they won’t start to be released right away, because the pandemic should not only end for us, but all over the world.”

– Kirill Razlogov, president of the Guild of Film Critics and Film Critics of the Russian Federation, on Russian viewers' preferences after the pandemic is over

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Some of Our Books

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The Little Humpbacked Horse

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Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod is a mid-sized provincial city that exists only in Russian metaphorical space. It has its roots in Gogol, and Ilf and Petrov, and is a place far from Moscow, but close to Russian hearts. It is a place of mystery and normality, of provincial innocence and Black Earth wisdom. Strange, inexplicable things happen in Stargorod. So do good things. And bad things. A lot like life everywhere, one might say. Only with a heavy dose of vodka, longing and mystery.
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The Samovar Murders

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Murder at the Dacha

Murder at the Dacha

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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

93 Untranslatable Russian Words

Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.
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Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

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Life Stories: Original Fiction By Russian Authors

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22 Russian Crosswords

22 Russian Crosswords

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