May 26, 2020

Weight, Weight, Don't Tell Me



Weight, Weight, Don't Tell Me
At least working from home means less banal water-cooler talk. Scott Akerman via Flickr

For many of us, coronavirus isolation hasn't exactly been a picnic, although it's had some unexpected consequences. Another impact of isolation protocols has recently been brought to light by the Russian online job-posting board SuperJob: according to a recent survey, 17% of Russians working from home have gained weight during the pandemic.

51% of Russians said they have maintained their normal weight while avoiding a commute, and just 13% lost weight, apparently squeezing in pushups between Zoom calls.

The non-scientific survey, which included three thousand working Russians from across the country, also found that women were more likely than men to gain weight; 21% versus 15%, respectively.

Apparently participating in social media trends doesn't burn many calories.

 

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