February 22, 2022

There's a Visa For That


There's a Visa For That
Getting from here to there may just get a little bit easier. The Russian Life files

Russia is not a particularly easy country to enter, and visa options abound. But some changes are in the offing.

A plan is brewing to add four new types of visas to help Russia “streamline” its process. The new visas included will be investor visas, special visas, ordinary medical visas, and universal visas. 

Although these visas do intend to simplify the selections, many existing visa types will remain, including worker and diplomatic visas, but the overall number of special-purpose entry visas will be reduced. Along with these changes, the general medical visa will not only allow for a foreigner to enter Russia to receive treatment, but will also allow that person to bring along a friend if they receive an invitation issued by the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia, at the request of a medical organization.

The bill aims to help those looking for medical treatment, but those seeking work in Russia will be relieved to discover that their visa process will be simplified as well. If the bill passes, any worker entering Russia on a visa will now receive the same benefits that so far only highly qualified specialists have received.

Even though it is good that Russia is looking to streamline its visa process, we find it far more interesting to hear about what hasn't been streamlined.

Gogol would be proud.

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