September 25, 2020

Stumped



Stumped
Fortunately, stumps are impartial to the outcome of votes. Safron Golikov, Kommersant.ru

Social media photos of Russians voting in this summer's constitutional referendum on tree stumps caused a stir on the internet. In response, Russia's election commission performed a "large-scale investigation" into tree stumps used as polling places. Only three cases were found.

Whether that's a lot or very few is up to the reader.

The internet outrage began with a photo of a ballot box on a stump in the town of Ulyanovsk. It was revealed that an elderly citizen had requested this location, as it was accessible and near their home. Another, in Bryansk, was placed on a stump for a similar reason, to accommodate an elderly neighbor with pneumonia.

Another, in the Vladimir region, was a popular meeting place in the middle of town, a convenient spot for the voting masses.

"The rest of the stumps that the election commissions was reproached for using during the all-Russian vote turned out to be fakes," noted the election commission.

That's a good thing, we think. We'd hate to see how tree spirits take to the Russian constitution.

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