February 11, 2020

St. Pete Metro History Dates Back 400 Million Years



St. Pete Metro History Dates Back 400 Million Years
If you were a paleontologist, you'd get really excited by this image. The rest of us, however, probably won't get it. Кружок любительской палеонтологии/ Amateur Paleontology Club, VKontakte

Architecturally-minded travelers to Russia often marvel at the underground metro stations of St. Petersburg and Moscow. Now, however, fans of paleontology can scratch their itch, too.

Fossils embedded in the limestone of St. Petersburg's Chkalovskaya Station have been found to contain extremely well-preserved fossils dating back 400 million years. The limestone has preserved prehistoric sea life remarkably well, including plants, endoceras, and bubbles.

While the limestone has faded over its 20 years of being on display in the station, the details of the fossils are remarkable. Images of the fossils were posted by the Amateur Paleontology Club on VK.com.

We always knew St. Petersburg's metro had a fascinating history, but had no idea it went back so far.

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