September 29, 2020

Sore Loser Turns Supervillain



Sore Loser Turns Supervillain
The only thing worse than poisoning the water supply is cutting it off altogether. Znak.ru, local contributor.

Former local deputy Vladimir Kurilov lost his September 13 reelection campaign, but his actions are still affecting his town of Troytsk, in Chelyabinsk Oblast.

Following his defeat, Kurilov cut off a water pump that his administration had installed. Now, locals are left high and dry.

The pump used to be hand-powered, until Kurilov replaced it with a button-operated electric mechanism years ago. Following his defeat, however, the electricity was cut off. His replacement official has tried to rectify the situation, to no avail.

While we applaud Kurilov's use of effective siege tactics, perhaps it was Machiavellian actions like this that caused him to lose the election in the first place.

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