March 17, 2022

Rapping for Peace


Rapping for Peace
Oxxxymiron Alina Platonova, Wikimedia Commons

Russian rappers Oxxxymiron and Morgenshtern have both taken a stance against the war in Ukraine. Oxxxymiron will be hosting a series of concerts around the world called "Russians Against War," and Morgenshtern released a music video titled "12," in which he condemns the war.

100% of the proceeds from Oxxxymiron's concerts will be going to Ukrainian refugees. Although he would like to hold protest concerts in Russia, claiming that tens of millions of Russians are against the war, Oxxxymiron is concerned for his safety. And it's no wonder why, considering that Russians are being arrested for anything resembling a protest, including holding up a blank piece of paper at Red Square.

Morgenshtern's most recent mumble rap alludes to the protests in Russia and the (more than) doubling of the exchange rate of the Ruble. Morgenshtern left Russia in November of 2021 after being accused of selling drugs online (although there wasn't any proof of this.) He is currently living in Saudi Arabia, where he is able to speak out against the atrocities of the war in Ukraine without fear of being prosecuted.

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