April 06, 2021

Lock and Load



Lock and Load
Practical? Maybe not. Badass? Definitely.
Vitaly V. Kuzmin, Wikimedia Commons

If you absolutely need to pepper the air with five shotgun shells in rapid succession, Russia's foremost arms manufacturer has you covered.

Rostech, the state monopoly corporation that oversees the production of military equipment, has announced the re-release of its revolver shotgun. We'll leave it up to you whether it looks goofy or cool.

The firearm, which features a drum of five 12-gauge shells that are fired in a semiautomatic sequence, is scheduled to enter production later this year for the civilian hunting sector. What exactly you need five quick shotgun blasts to hunt is anyone's guess.

Dubbed the MTc-255, it's likely to be the only gun of its kind on the market. A limited production run occurred in the 1990s and 2000s, but, due to the poor economic situation in Russia at the time (apparently demand for revolver shotguns just wasn't there), the project fizzled out. Rostech is now proud to be breathing new life into this curio, since Russia's fiscal situation is doing well enough these days that some citizens might have the disposable income to pick one up.

Unfortunately, the revolver shotgun is a little old-school in that it doesn't sync to your phone. But that just makes those high-noon cattle-rustler patrols all the more immersive.

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