July 13, 2021

Dear Cheese


Dear Cheese
Cheese is dear to many, but not usually made of deer at all.  Photo by Razvan Mirel via Unsplash

The Altai region of Russia has always been a great location for gastro-tourism, but a new patent in the region for cheese produced using material from the antlers of young deer may be pushing that envelope just a tad. The Federal Altai Scientific Center of Agrobiotechnology (owner of the patent) has been doing experiments for the past month to determine the exact benefits of cheese made with this unusual add-in.

The cheese itself is soft in texture but is strong in many important biological benefits, such as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-osteoporotic effects. Their research has also proven that the cheese can help with immunity and physical endurance as well as with the condition and quality of your hair, skin, and nails due to its high content of collagen.

The antlers of the Maral deer in the Altai have actually been used for medicinal purposes for a very long time, so the addition of it to cheese is just another tasty way to get your multivitamin. But if you aren't feeling quite so adventurous, there are plenty of other healthful Russian berries and teas to help fill that void as well. 

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