September 08, 2021

Baba Yaga's Birthday Bash


Baba Yaga's Birthday Bash
Hopefully, she leaves the giant mortar and pestle at home with the chicken-legged house.  The Russian Life digital archive

Apparently, Russia's favorite witch celebrates her birthday in September, and all of the residents in Yekaterinburg party along with her. We were unaware that this mythical forest recluse even has a birthday, but we are happy that she is getting the recognition that she deserves. 

Fittingly, the party will be held in the city's Fairytale Park, and the attendants will mostly be eager schoolchildren (Baba Yaga's favorite food). Other fairytale characters will make an appearance in the form of costumed actors, such as the "vodyanoi" (a water spirit) and "leshi" (forest spirit) (sadly, the domovoi decided to stay home).

As for the festivities, the celebrations will include prize raffles, folk games, theatre performances, and (oddly enough) yoga. We are glad to see that Baba Yaga has quit the kidnapping and taken up more wholesome forms of entertainment instead. 

 

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