January 03, 2022

A Mayo Mystery


A Mayo Mystery
Good stuff, right there.  Wikimedia Commons user jules.

Russia's favorite condiment helped solve a recent crime in the city of Perm: empty mayonnaise containers led to the arrest of a burglar who had evaded capture for weeks.

A string of burglaries in the city had left authorities stumped. The suspect had caused an estimated 300,000 rubles ($4000) in damages and had left little evidence at the scene of the crime.

The police, however, soon realized that the perp cased only the bottom three floors of buildings, and that he left one piece of evidence at each crime scene: a large, empty plastic bucket that had once contained mayonnaise. Authorities theorized that these were used to make entry easier.

From this, police deduced that the criminal had an injured foot or leg, a hypothesis that was confirmed on CCTV footage. After tracking him down, the man confessed to burglary, and for using the buckets to ease his entry.

The implication seems to be that the robber was a fan of mayo, if his collection of empty buckets is anything to go by.

 

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