January 04, 2021

Wedding Guest of Woe


Wedding Guest of Woe
Wedding photos led to trouble for this couple. Image by Mwinog2777 via Wikimedia Commons

Weddings are generally considered a time of celebration and happiness, but for one couple in Kaliningrad, a wedding led to something less pleasant: jail time.

The wedding of Antonina Zimina and Konstantin Antonets led to both bride and groom being arrested for state treason after posting a photo to social media.

The photo in question allegedly features a counterintelligence officer from Russia’s Federal Security Service (FSB), who was a guest at the wedding. State prosecutors accused the couple of sharing the photo with Latvia after photos from the wedding posted to social media were included in a Baltic TV program.

The couple was detained in July 2018, and their trial began behind closed doors in May. A court has now sentenced them to significant jail terms: Zimina to 13 years in a penal colony, and Antonets to 12.5 years in a maximum-security prison. According to their lawyer, the couple has denied any wrongdoing and will appeal the sentence.

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