November 02, 2022

To the Frontline or to Prison


To the Frontline or to Prison

“Now they have been abandoned without command. They are in some village in the Luhansk region. They need to get out of there because now they are attacked again by an army of enemies. How will they return to Russia? What will happen to them next? We can’t even imagine.”

– Irina, wife of a Russian soldier mobilized in Ukraine

After being mobilized to Ukraine, soldiers are now being threatened with jail time for refusing to return to the front

On October 28, a group of wives and mothers of soldiers made an official plea to not have their men sent back to the frontlines. The troops had been sent to the front in mid-October, but, according to stories they told their families, they were not given provisions, the ability to communicate with headquarters, and lacked proper training.

The day before the women made their plea, the soldiers had retreated from the frontline after heavy losses. They were reportedly ill-equipped to handle the Ukrainian army's tank and drone attacks, having only been given machine guns, and did not have any air defense.

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