July 01, 2022

Summer Fun at a Russian Prison


Summer Fun at a Russian Prison
Just you and your prison gang enjoying the sunshine and water. Laslovarga, Wikimedia Commons

Even as Russia invades Ukraine, there are some things that have stayed the same. For instance, Russian prison officials getting up to shenanigans.

A tender announcement posted on a website for public procurement specified a need for a "towed water banana." The institution requesting the watersports equipment was Penal Colony No. 7 in Meleuz, in the Russian republic of Bashkiria.

The posting details requirements, including that the banana must be able to sit six people and measure 3.9 meters × 2.4 meters × 0.75 meters (approx. 13 ft x 8 ft x 2.5 ft). The colony has also requested that the banana come with all necessary accessories, including a pump, case, a repair kit, and necessary documentation. All of this must not cost more than R 133,000, or $2,440.

July 12 is the deadline for delivery, so if you're looking to unload your watersports gear, now's your opportunity.

While we can't exactly picture guards and inmates frolicking on a sunny Russian beach, taking turns driving the boat and giggling on the inflatable, we assume that the "towed water banana" will at least be put to good use.

 

 

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