November 13, 2020

Rocket Man Turns Elton John


Rocket Man Turns Elton John
"Y'know it's gonna be a long, long time, Till touchdown brings me back again tonight..." The RussianLife Files

Roscosmos isn't all about space; it's also a great place to share your latest songs. Or at least, that's what the organization's director thinks.

Russia's NASA analog now sports a part of their website holding "Music about Space," written by director Dmitri Rogozin, his wife Tatiana, and other Roscosmos officials. Mercifully, they don't perform them.

The songs have titles such as "Over Russia", "We Tear the Sky to Shreds", "Baikonur," "Gagarin, I Loved You," "And Apple Trees Will Bloom on Mars," and, our favorite, "They Beat Us, We Fly." In total, 18 songs are featured, five of which were penned by the director himself.

This isn't Roscosmos' first foray into digital media: earlier this year, the administration announced its new TV channel.

Some of the songs can be accessed on YouTube, complete with music-video visuals.

Take a listen for yourself here.

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