October 07, 2020

Not-So-Fresh Siberian Air


Not-So-Fresh Siberian Air
A great landscape for clear-cut deforestation and the construction of a paper mill. Nabolog, Wikimedia Commons

When we imagine Siberia, we usually think of tall mountains, untouched forests, and wild rivers populated with bears, moose, and sometimes mammoths. We also imagine bitter cold and work camps. However, a recent study found that the residents of Siberia aren't as close to nature as you might think.

According to a recent state-led study, 40% of Siberia's population lives in areas with polluted air. The study ascribed the poor air quality to large industrial centers dotted throughout the region. Per one official involved in the findings, these 22 cities hold the plurality of citizens, who experience what he termed a "black sky" regime.

Add to this exploding permafrost, and we can't say that it's a good time to visit Russia's east.

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