February 04, 2024

No Fog for This Hedgehog


No Fog for This Hedgehog
Cute, but not exceptionally fast. The Russian Life files.

Pykh Pykhich isn't your typical weatherman. He's much cuter.

The hedgehog, a resident of Krasnoyarsk's Roev Ruchey Zoo whose name means "Puff, son of Puff," predicted that winter will end early, thanks to a very scientific method.

Keepers placed Pykh in an enclosure with two bowls of delicious mealworms: one to symbolize continued winter, and another an early spring. Pykh reportedly headed straight for the sunny mealworms, forecasting a swift end to dreary weather.

To be sure of his choice, Pykh was removed from the enclosure and placed back inside. He chose the early spring mealworms again.

Pykh, the mascot of Russia's "Hedgehog Day," corroborates Punxsutawney Phil's predictions stateside: On Feb. 2, the American groundhog also predicted an early spring.

We can't argue with rodents.

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