January 08, 2023

Made in Russia, Born in Argentina


Made in Russia, Born in Argentina
The director of "Rody v Mire," Eva Pekurova, holding her baby in front of the Swiss-Argentine Hospital in Buenos Aires. Eva Pekurova, Instagram.

Throughout January, the Argentine press has been reporting that the capital, Buenos Aires, has become a birth tourism hub for pregnant Russians.

Unlike many Western countries, Argentina has opposed sanctions on Russia and did not change its visa-free policy. Therefore, many Russians who seek better opportunities for their kids and a way to leave Russia have been traveling to Argentina. The Guardian reported that Georgy Polin, head of the consular department of the Russian Embassy in Argentina, estimated that between 2,000 and 2,500 Russians moved to Argentina in 2022. The number is expected to increase to 10,000 by 2023.

The country's citizenship policies are particularly appealing. Argentina grants birthright citizenship (automatic citizenship if you are born on the territory of the country) and allows parents of an Argentine-born baby to naturalize quickly. Another perk is that Argentine citizens can make short trips to 171 countries without a visa. Buenos Aires also has a high-quality public and private healthcare system. 

Agencies like the Belarussian "Rody v Mire" ("Giving Birth in the World") and Baby.RuArgentina offer packages from $2,000-15,000 that include housing, doctor's appointments, hospital stays, and translators. 

Russian families are already incorporating some Argentinianality into their newborns. The Argentine Newspaper La Nacion recorded a case of a Russian-heritage baby named "Angel" after Angel Di Maria, the soccer player who scored a decisive goal in the recent World Cup final against France.

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