June 28, 2021

Let There Be Light


Let There Be Light
Ночь, улица, фонарь...  Photo by Sven Scheuermeier via unsplash

A police officer in Ingushetia literally lightened things up in his native village of Kani by purchasing a whole new set of street lights for his community. With help from friends and family, and after five years of saving, he was able to collect the five million rubles (approximately $69,250) needed to complete the generous project. 

He was inspired to support his hometown in order to help out the aging population, as most of the younger generation has left or is leaving the village for cities. He said that, in many parts of the village, it is too dangerous to walk at night on the streets, and that people have broken their arms or been bitten by dogs while ambling through in the pitch-black darkness. 

This is not the first time this man has used his generous spirit to give back to where he came from. He also paid for a statue in the village to honor those who fought in World War Two. Maybe he'll buy them some new crosswalks next? 

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